Topics

moderated Open Source?


Eric di Domenico
 

I would love to be able to help fix some of the issues I am experiencing. 


 

Eric,

I would love to be able to help fix some of the issues I am
experiencing.
Would using the API help with any of them?
https://beta.groups.io/g/api

Shal


Eric di Domenico
 

A lot of the API is read only. If it was OSS I could submit a PR with a proposal.

for example, my group users are asking about managed tagging for photos. I looked at the API thinking I might be able to update titles with hashtags or something but it’s readonly.


 

On Mon, Sep 16, 2019 at 3:45 AM Eric di Domenico <eric@...> wrote:
A lot of the API is read only. If it was OSS I could submit a PR with a proposal.

for example, my group users are asking about managed tagging for photos. I looked at the API thinking I might be able to update titles with hashtags or something but it’s readonly.

Funny you should mention photos. I just added all the photos api endpoints. You can now modify photos and albums. Please post on the API group if you have any questions or issues using those endpoints.

As for open source, I'm a big believer in it. I don't see the groups.io code being open sourced any time soon however. It's in no condition. It's a distributed system, so requires a lot of work to get up and running in a development environment. There are no docker containers or anything like that.

My goal is to have a feature complete and easy to use API that anyone can build on top of. And of course to always have the ability to export your data whenever you want, easily.

Thanks,
Mark


 

Replying to my own email... I could see at some point re-implementing the web interface on top of the public API. Once that's done, that'd be an easy thing to open source. Also, depending on what business model I decide on for the app (ie something like whether I charge enterprise groups extra for a custom version of the app), there is a scenario where I'd open source that as well.

Thanks,
Mark


Marv Waschke
 

Highly recommend open sourcing. The company I worked for open-sourced several products that I worked on. We saw no dips in revenue and it made the products more salable. These were enterprise service management products and utilities that no one in their right mind would consider compiling themselves and using without support. We invited customers to review the code before purchasing licenses. I suspect few actually did so, but the fact that they were able to bolstered their confidence in the products.
We got a few contributed bug fixes out of it, but not as many as I expected. Making use of contributed bug fixes was much harder than I anticipated.After reviewing and testing the fixes, most had to be rewritten to meet our coding standards and ended up costing about as much as we would have spent fixing them ourselves.
In retrospect, I would have liked to have invested in a management process for contributions and made it a routine part of our dev methodology. Unfortunately, our executive management was enlightened, but not that enlightened, and using contributions ended up being an ad hoc time suck. I.e. I spent a lot of weekends reviewing contributed code, rewriting and checking it into the build, and writing test cases for QA.
Best, Marv