locked Spammer attack- More bad news


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

I am  behind  on beta messages.  However  I  have more bad news I feel everyone should  be informed  about .
To be on the safe side Moderators should advise their members to change their passwords because this is a HUGE 
breach of emails. 

May 7th, 2016 at 12:56 pm



 

Vickie

 









From: Mark Fletcher <markf@corp.groups.io>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2016 11:15 AM
Subject: [beta] Spammer attack

Hi All,

Yesterday afternoon, a spammer created a couple of groups and then used the invite feature to invite a few hundred thousand people to his spam lists. We had restrictions in place against inviting that many people, but there was a bug and it didn't work. I disabled the groups and re-did the restriction conditions for inviting. Early this morning, he struck again, and unfortunately was able to exploit a different hole in the invite process to send out a lot of invites to his spam groups. I have disabled those groups as well.

Until I can implement a better way of preventing invite abuse, I have had to disable the invite feature for all groups.

During my cleanup of his mess this morning, one of the mail queues got corrupted (I don't know how as of yet). That means some email sent in the last 3 hours or so may not have been delivered. I have the corrupt queue and will try to pull the messages out of it, but I'm not sure how successful I will be.

This incident may unfortunately cause some email providers to temporarily block or delay email from Groups.io. 

I have traded emails with this person. At one point yesterday he offered me $200/month to host his 6M person spam list. I told him to go away; he obviously didn't listen.

I sincerely apologize for all of this. Hardening the service (moreso) against these attacks is my number one priority. I'll keep you updated.

Thanks,
Mark



 

Vickie,

Thanks for this. I'll forward it to my group immediately and change all my passwords.

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 7:39 AM, vickie via Groups.io <vickie_00@...> wrote:
I am  behind  on beta messages.  However  I  have more bad news I feel everyone should  be informed  about .
To be on the safe side Moderators should advise their members to change their passwords because this is a HUGE 
breach of emails. 

May 7th, 2016 at 12:56 pm



 

Vickie

 









From: Mark Fletcher <markf@corp.groups.io>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2016 11:15 AM
Subject: [beta] Spammer attack

Hi All,

Yesterday afternoon, a spammer created a couple of groups and then used the invite feature to invite a few hundred thousand people to his spam lists. We had restrictions in place against inviting that many people, but there was a bug and it didn't work. I disabled the groups and re-did the restriction conditions for inviting. Early this morning, he struck again, and unfortunately was able to exploit a different hole in the invite process to send out a lot of invites to his spam groups. I have disabled those groups as well.

Until I can implement a better way of preventing invite abuse, I have had to disable the invite feature for all groups.

During my cleanup of his mess this morning, one of the mail queues got corrupted (I don't know how as of yet). That means some email sent in the last 3 hours or so may not have been delivered. I have the corrupt queue and will try to pull the messages out of it, but I'm not sure how successful I will be.

This incident may unfortunately cause some email providers to temporarily block or delay email from Groups.io. 

I have traded emails with this person. At one point yesterday he offered me $200/month to host his 6M person spam list. I told him to go away; he obviously didn't listen.

I sincerely apologize for all of this. Hardening the service (moreso) against these attacks is my number one priority. I'll keep you updated.

Thanks,
Mark




--
J

It's dumb to buy smart water.


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

Your welcome J..  
Wish I knew the spammers email that attacked Mark so I can block that email.
One can't be too careful. 

Hope you have a very special mothers day today

  
Vickie

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 10:54 AM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

Vickie,

Thanks for this. I'll forward it to my group immediately and change all my passwords.

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 7:39 AM, vickie via Groups.io <vickie_00@...> wrote:
I am  behind  on beta messages.  However  I  have more bad news I feel everyone should  be informed  about .
To be on the safe side Moderators should advise their members to change their passwords because this is a HUGE 
breach of emails. 

May 7th, 2016 at 12:56 pm



 

Vickie

 









From: Mark Fletcher <markf@corp.groups.io>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2016 11:15 AM
Subject: [beta] Spammer attack

Hi All,

Yesterday afternoon, a spammer created a couple of groups and then used the invite feature to invite a few hundred thousand people to his spam lists. We had restrictions in place against inviting that many people, but there was a bug and it didn't work. I disabled the groups and re-did the restriction conditions for inviting. Early this morning, he struck again, and unfortunately was able to exploit a different hole in the invite process to send out a lot of invites to his spam groups. I have disabled those groups as well.

Until I can implement a better way of preventing invite abuse, I have had to disable the invite feature for all groups.

During my cleanup of his mess this morning, one of the mail queues got corrupted (I don't know how as of yet). That means some email sent in the last 3 hours or so may not have been delivered. I have the corrupt queue and will try to pull the messages out of it, but I'm not sure how successful I will be.

This incident may unfortunately cause some email providers to temporarily block or delay email from Groups.io. 

I have traded emails with this person. At one point yesterday he offered me $200/month to host his 6M person spam list. I told him to go away; he obviously didn't listen.

I sincerely apologize for all of this. Hardening the service (moreso) against these attacks is my number one priority. I'll keep you updated.

Thanks,
Mark




--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.



 

From the Reuters link it seems that it was mainly the Russian email server that was compromised, with smaller fractions of yahoo and google. But you can't be too careful.
--
J

It's dumb to buy smart water.


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

 I am sure some groups have international members .


 Ditto -But you can't be too careful.
-- 

 

Vickie

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 11:02 AM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

From the Reuters link it seems that it was mainly the Russian email server that was compromised, with smaller fractions of yahoo and google. But you can't be too careful.
--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.



 

Of course. But it's worth repeating that information.

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 8:06 AM, vickie via Groups.io <vickie_00@...> wrote:
 I am sure some groups have international members .


 Ditto -But you can't be too careful.
-- 

 

Vickie

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 11:02 AM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

From the Reuters link it seems that it was mainly the Russian email server that was compromised, with smaller fractions of yahoo and google. But you can't be too careful.
--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.




--
J

It's dumb to buy smart water.


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

Yes, absolutely


 

Vickie 

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 11:12 AM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

Of course. But it's worth repeating that information.

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 8:06 AM, vickie via Groups.io <vickie_00@...> wrote:
 I am sure some groups have international members .


 Ditto -But you can't be too careful.
-- 

 

Vickie

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 11:02 AM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

From the Reuters link it seems that it was mainly the Russian email server that was compromised, with smaller fractions of yahoo and google. But you can't be too careful.
--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.




--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.



Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Since Google sends you an e-mail message noting when your account has been used to log in for any of its services on any machine or from any location it doesn't already recognize as associated with you.  There will be warning if someone has accessed your account who wasn't you.

I don't rush to change passwords anymore on Google/Gmail because of this.  

Brian


 

I guess I worry that a hacker will get in and change my password and then, because I can no longer log in, I won't get the warning email. But maybe that's being overly paranoid. :-)
--
J

It's dumb to buy smart water.


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

Nothing wrong with being overly paranoid,  especially if you own a business.. 
If they can hack microsoft, yahoo , Hotmail,   and more  I say  lean on being paranoid lol .

Vickie

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 12:11 PM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

I guess I worry that a hacker will get in and change my password and then, because I can no longer log in, I won't get the warning email. But maybe that's being overly paranoid. :-)
--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.



Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Related to Vickie's response, my degree of paranoia regarding any potential security breach is predicated on how much immediate damage might result.  If it's huge, that gets one set of precautionary actions, if not, it gets another.

My experience with most of these e-mail account hacks is that they're done "for the glory of it" and very little else.  These days there's little need to actually hack into someone's actual e-mail account when spoofing is such an easy thing to do.  Throw a sniffer out there, collect some random e-mail addresses, and create your spam or phishing messages using those or by using the e-mail address of the actual business you're trying to make yourself appear to be.

In general, I've gotten pretty far away from the, "I need to change my password yesterday!!," position based on too many years of experience with these sorts of hacks.  Others, of course, feel differently and act differently.  It's a matter of personal risk assessment and what risks you're comfortable in accepting.

Brian


 

This one says they're being traded on the black market.

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 9:30 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Related to Vickie's response, my degree of paranoia regarding any potential security breach is predicated on how much immediate damage might result.  If it's huge, that gets one set of precautionary actions, if not, it gets another.

My experience with most of these e-mail account hacks is that they're done "for the glory of it" and very little else.  These days there's little need to actually hack into someone's actual e-mail account when spoofing is such an easy thing to do.  Throw a sniffer out there, collect some random e-mail addresses, and create your spam or phishing messages using those or by using the e-mail address of the actual business you're trying to make yourself appear to be.

In general, I've gotten pretty far away from the, "I need to change my password yesterday!!," position based on too many years of experience with these sorts of hacks.  Others, of course, feel differently and act differently.  It's a matter of personal risk assessment and what risks you're comfortable in accepting.

Brian



--
J

It's dumb to buy smart water.


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

J,  >>>This one says they're being traded on the black market.


According to this website it's a booming business.  More money  than selling drugs..

To   Brian Vogel,  though you feel differently  about it  I give an example of Hillary Clinton a government official   suffering the affects of her email   being hacked.  

I choose to  use caution at all times.

 

Vickie

 









From: J_catlady <j.olivia.catlady@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

This one says they're being traded on the black market.

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 9:30 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Related to Vickie's response, my degree of paranoia regarding any potential security breach is predicated on how much immediate damage might result.  If it's huge, that gets one set of precautionary actions, if not, it gets another.
My experience with most of these e-mail account hacks is that they're done "for the glory of it" and very little else.  These days there's little need to actually hack into someone's actual e-mail account when spoofing is such an easy thing to do.  Throw a sniffer out there, collect some random e-mail addresses, and create your spam or phishing messages using those or by using the e-mail address of the actual business you're trying to make yourself appear to be.
In general, I've gotten pretty far away from the, "I need to change my password yesterday!!," position based on too many years of experience with these sorts of hacks.  Others, of course, feel differently and act differently.  It's a matter of personal risk assessment and what risks you're comfortable in accepting.
Brian


--
J
It's dumb to buy smart water.



Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

J_catlady,

        I read what it says, but I don't necessarily believe everything I read.  What makes that claim particularly "fishy" as far as I'm concerned is the statement that the alleged hacker was willing to hand this data over "for fame."

        If he was selling on the black market, this information had far more financial value to him than fame does, and criminals in it for the money are generally doing every last thing they can to remain in the shadows.

        There's a lot of hype in the tech press.  I don't doubt the hack, I do doubt that anyone actually knows what the hacker did with the data.

        Like I said, one must undertake a risk assessment and act accordingly.  In my case acting accordingly is simply watchful waiting.  If any suspicious activity turns up in the next few days to weeks then I'll do something more.  I'm not expecting to have to do more.

Brian


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Vickie,

           Different strokes for different folks.  I also suggest you show me anything that reports that Hillary Clinton's e-mail was actually hacked - so far there's not been a single report that it was hacked and many reports indicating that it was not.  Speculation is rife and a lot of that speculation strains credulity.

Brian


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

Brian,   As far as Hiliray Clinton it's   spoken of in every news channel/ media
One guy was arrested for hacking her email account.

 You can check for yourself. I am not going to do the research for you. sorry.
 

Vickie

 









From: Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 1:13 PM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

Vickie,
           Different strokes for different folks.  I also suggest you show me anything that reports that Hillary Clinton's e-mail was actually hacked - so far there's not been a single report that it was hacked and many reports indicating that it was not.  Speculation is rife and a lot of that speculation strains credulity.
Brian



Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Vickie,

           I have checked.  The only thing that the hacker, known as Guccifer, is known to have hacked is an exchange between Clinton and Blumenthal, and it remains unclear exactly who he hacked to get it.  See here (and others, but I'm not going to post endless links).

           Were there were to have been any substantial hacking of Clinton's e-mail server I have absolutely no doubt that we'd have another Julian Assange/Wikileaks incident going on.  The political value of such a revelation would be incalculable.  The fact that we don't speaks volumes.

            Like I said earlier, a lot of speculation strains credulity.

Brian


 

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 11:12 am, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
the hacker, known as Guccifer,

Is that a cross between Gucci and Lucifer?  
--
J

It's dumb to buy smart water.


vickie <vickie_00@...>
 

Brian, 
This topic is shifting  towards a political discussion and I do not want to go there.
I am sorry I even used Hilary as an example.. ugh..lol
Let's  just say we agree to disagree.
Peace!
 

Vickie

 









From: Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
To: beta@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 2:12 PM
Subject: Re: [beta] Spammer attack- More bad news

Vickie,
           I have checked.  The only thing that the hacker, known as Guccifer, is known to have hacked is an exchange between Clinton and Blumenthal, and it remains unclear exactly who he hacked to get it.  See here (and others, but I'm not going to post endless links).
           Were there were to have been any substantial hacking of Clinton's e-mail server I have absolutely no doubt that we'd have another Julian Assange/Wikileaks incident going on.  The political value of such a revelation would be incalculable.  The fact that we don't speaks volumes.
            Like I said earlier, a lot of speculation strains credulity.
Brian



Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Vickie,

          I agree that we should agree to disagree and that the conversation *could* take a turn toward pure politics, but I was assiduously avoiding that directly.

          I would be saying the same thing no matter who was involved.  Many hackers, including the one arrested, are generally lusting after fame in their own circles and, with the veil of cyber anonymity, beyond.  A chance to be world renowned would not be passed up - ever.   That brand of hacker is distinctly different in their goals than a cybercriminal hacker.

Brian